Skip to main content

Something's Different

I've been home from Brazil for 10 days now, and I'm not certain what it is, but something has changed in me.  It's hard to explain or define, but after World Youth Day I'm not the same.  It's difficult to define or pin-point; I only have the evidence of what I can see and how I feel now.  This weekend we had a visiting priest, Fr. Emmanual, from the Democratic Republic of the Congo.  I was the one to pick him up at the bus station and I believe my life was changed by the conversation I had in the car ride to his host family's house.

I don't mean dramatically changed to the point where I am going to sell my stuff, leave everything, and begin mission work; but as I type that, it doesn't seem like the most terrible idea.  I think I mean an even more radical change than that - what if I had my life in perspective all the time?  How could I do that?  What do I even mean by that?

Well, I don't know how - but what I mean is the 22,000 parishioners he has in his parish live without electricity, water, transportation, education, and the Eucharist.  A priest comes to their village approximately every 2 months.  They live without the Sacraments - including Confirmation which they wait 5 to 7 years for.  That doesn't seem like a big deal until I think about the uproar the parents of our 9th grade Confirmation candidates were having about not knowing the date more than 5 months in advance; and I'm sure the grief they are giving because it is on a Tuesday evening and not on a Saturday, which is much more convenient.

I remember back in the early spring one Saturday evening there was a bad storm and the power went out.  MG and I were playing bananagrams watching movies on her laptop and were going to go to her house if it didn't come on before bed because we didn't know what to do.  Some of Fr. Emmanuel's parishioners have never experienced electricity.

They say there are only 6 degrees of separation - I am separated by these people with only 1 degree.  I feel connected to them in some way that I cannot explain.

I've been on mission trips before, here and abroad.  In the US, I did service work in Pittsburgh, Tennessee, and Charlotte.  I've seen some poor Americans.  Abroad, I have done mission work in Brazil (outside of Sao Paulo) and Nicaragua (near Managua).  The poor I encountered there were much different than those in the US.  But they are still different than the people that Fr. Emmanuel serves in the Congo.

Then, I think back to the past 48 to 72 hours and the items that I've complained about: musical selections, people I have to be around, adults who don't know how to read their emails, my state of life, how long it takes to do my laundry, and many more I've chosen to block from my memory.

I want my life to mean something ... I don't want to just go along focusing on how life can serve me.  I'm restless with my state in life, maybe even a little in my job - I love the hours, the freedom it gives my weekends, I've even found ways to occupy myself on Sunday evenings.  All that and I'm not sure I'm making any difference, any contribution to the world, any improvement to the world.  Maybe this job can be a means to an end - it can be the financial funding to what I do that makes a difference, a contribution, a change to the world.

Now I just need to seek out - discern, what that can be.

Maybe it's visiting Fr. Emmanuel in the Congo - a plane ticket is about $1600; Brazil for WYD was more expensive than that - I'm pretty sure visiting Africa is in my future.  When and to do what? Now those are things to discover!

Comments

  1. Katie -
    Have you heard of this blog:
    www.midwife4jesus.blogspot.com

    You are making a difference.

    Being saintly isn't rocket science. It IS doing what you are called to do RIGHT NOW and doing it to the best of your ability without complaint.

    We all fail, but God still loves us!

    Sara M.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

I Look Into my Inbox and What Did I See?

I receive the weekly notes from the Catholic Match Institute since my unsuccessful dabble in Online
Dating some time ago (link) and today's included the face of one of my favorite priests. A man who helped me become the Catholic woman, for better or worse, that I am today. He is doing a series of five videos for CM through Advent. The first two are below ... I encourage you to watch them and stay tuned for the next three! Fr. Ananias, OSB - what an Advent treat!




When Others Despise You

In general I appreciate when people like me, as I think most people do. For me, it's really hard when people dislike me, even if I don't have to be around them all of the time. I get anxious thinking about the next time we will be in the same location and if I'll be able to just kindly avoid them or if there will be an awkward confrontation. There's a line in scripture about how blessed we are when others despised us because they hated Him first. Him, being Jesus, of course.

But is that always the case? Am I applying a section of scripture to a situation to which it has no relationship? Am I using a passage of scripture to make myself feel better about the actions that I'm going to take, to justify it to myself and others? Am I manipulating the Lord's words to promote my own agenda in the name of the Lord?

I wonder this regarding many things. Passages like "The Lord will fulfill His promises" in relationship to my relationship status. Did He promise t…

Thoughts from A Color Run Volunteer

Well, we did it!  It's over and I'm back to my regular color.  All it took was some scrubbing in the shower and a big load of laundry!

So, how was it?  Well, we began looking like this:


and ended looking like this:


Yes - VERY pink!!!  It was awesome!

Now, the thoughts (play-by-play) of the day:

We began at 7am (actually an hour later than first expected).  When we arrived a few minutes early we went over to the Volunteer Registration tent (even though we were told to go to the color station first) and they were super disorganized.  Although they had a lot of volunteers, the check-in process was not amazing.  It's a place for some definite improvement on their part!  However, it was the first time in Charlotte and the only expectations were from the volunteer coordinators who hadn't experienced the run yet, so understandable.

We got to our PINK station - the first color station, where we were assigned and found out it was BLUE!  We were given instructions (only dip into…